sexy superhero comedy (or not)

COMICS-RELATED Artwork AND MISCELLANEOUS bLABBERY

182 notes

Dang, almost forgot… This July 4th weekend represents the 10th anniversary of the very earliest version of Empowered! 
10 years ago this weekend, I was working on a couple of sketches I owed some folks, several of which depicted various superheroines as (ahem) “damsels in distress.” I’d gotten more than a little bored with the sketches, to be honest, and started thinking about how much the life of a distress-prone superheroine would probably suck.
The one-page strip above was the result: A generic, unnamed superheroine embarrassed by having to wear a skin-tight “supersuit.” More than a tad goofy, it’s true, but I still found drawing the page a bit more fulfilling than cranking out another “heroine laid low” illustration. Note that the page still had to deliver a modicum of the ol’ “fan service,” hence Emp’s prominently featured behind. (Note also that, much later on, I redrew and expanded this one-pager into a three-page version for the published version of Empowered. Dig those early, scrawled versions of Emp’s teammates in the background…)
Had no idea, back then, that this first throwaway gag would mutate and morph and complicate itself over the years into the longest ongoing project of my comics career. All the sweeping, majestic plans I once had for grander and more ambitious (and more superficially serious) comics projects came to naught, while this random, unlikely little weed of a comic grew into a mighty oak, quite to my surprise. Best-laid plans and all that, right?
Note that the Empowered franchise’s actual published anniversary isn’t until March 2017, though; I’m hoping to do something special to commemorate that anniversary.
So, uh… Happy birthday, Emp!

Dang, almost forgot… This July 4th weekend represents the 10th anniversary of the very earliest version of Empowered!

10 years ago this weekend, I was working on a couple of sketches I owed some folks, several of which depicted various superheroines as (ahem) “damsels in distress.” I’d gotten more than a little bored with the sketches, to be honest, and started thinking about how much the life of a distress-prone superheroine would probably suck.

The one-page strip above was the result: A generic, unnamed superheroine embarrassed by having to wear a skin-tight “supersuit.” More than a tad goofy, it’s true, but I still found drawing the page a bit more fulfilling than cranking out another “heroine laid low” illustration. Note that the page still had to deliver a modicum of the ol’ “fan service,” hence Emp’s prominently featured behind. (Note also that, much later on, I redrew and expanded this one-pager into a three-page version for the published version of Empowered. Dig those early, scrawled versions of Emp’s teammates in the background…)

Had no idea, back then, that this first throwaway gag would mutate and morph and complicate itself over the years into the longest ongoing project of my comics career. All the sweeping, majestic plans I once had for grander and more ambitious (and more superficially serious) comics projects came to naught, while this random, unlikely little weed of a comic grew into a mighty oak, quite to my surprise. Best-laid plans and all that, right?

Note that the Empowered franchise’s actual published anniversary isn’t until March 2017, though; I’m hoping to do something special to commemorate that anniversary.

So, uh… Happy birthday, Emp!

Filed under Empowered Adam Warren comic pages

146 notes

After (at least) three months away from the book, my first new page from  Empowered vol.9, the next installment in my ongoing “sexy superhero comedy” series published by Dark Horse Comics.

Note that I really should’ve been depicting more rescue work on Emp’s part before this, as the rather peculiar city where she lives would constantly demand such feats. I’ve instead usually defaulted to showing her fighting J. Random Supervillain in front of sketchy urban debris, as that makes for much faster page production than wrestling with the slower, tougher tasks of environmental depiction and crowd work required for rescue scenes.

Well, I’m beginning the reluctant, begrudging trudge towards depicting Emp’s city in greater detail, and more rescue work will be part of that grind. Consider this page’s rescued toddler as my first step in that direction, okay?

Filed under Empowered Adam Warren Comics comic pages superheroine

31 notes

franzferdinand2 asked: Since you've been watching 24, who are your other favorite fictional characters who turn into unstoppable wrecking balls of destruction?

iamdavidbrothers:

I’m a big Frank Miller fan, but Marv is pretty wack. He’s too…too nothing but his character type. Not enough depth.

The Ennis/Braithwaite & Ennis/Parlov Punisher are pretty high up there for me. Braithwaite’s was a huge mass of flesh and Parlov’s was the meanest looney toon ever. They perfectly fit the character and scenarios.

Reese from Person of Interest is way up there too. There’s a good ep where he’s wearing body armor and shrugs off some bullets, but there’s ANOTHER ep where he no-sells some bullets without the armor, which was the bossest move I’d seen in the show up to that point.

Daniel Craig as James Bond is way up there. I knew I’d like Casino Royale once the black and white opening was through, but the moment I realized I’d love it was when, given the option of parkouring his way after a bad guy or finding another route, he just smashes through the drywall like it’s nothing. Pretty much any scene where somebody leaps from behind something solid to grab somebody gets me, even if it’s just particle board or sheet rock.

Iko Uwais as Rama from The Raid is a good one. A lifelong love for video games has left me overly fond of seeing hallways full of people get mollywhopped, and there are some seriously impressive hallway beatdowns in both those movies. There were even a couple restaurant beatdowns in the second, which is another favorite.

Donnie Yen’s supercop character in general maybe doesn’t count but it should. It’s pleasing to see that guy turn from beleaguered cop to death-dealer, especially when they let him show off his speed.

He doesn’t have one yet, but Liev Schreiber looks like he should. I hope he gets a good action role. Ray Donovan isn’t it, though it has moments.

Tragically enough, I’ve long bottled up a spittle-emitting rant about why THE RAID’s earlier knife-and-tonfa hallway fight is utterly and completely inferior to the machete-based hallway fight later on in the film. Sad, really. (Short version: Fight choreography pitting a protagonist against a limited number of enemies allows for much richer, complex and clever action storytelling than having Our Hero just decimate an endless stream of randos.)

308 notes

Favorite con sketch of the year so far (cranked out on a hotel bartop, no less).

Hell, I’d do a TEEN TITANS book if it featured this version of Starfire. (Okay, maybe not, but it was surprisingly fun to draw an illo riffing off my bud Glen Murakami’s TITANS animation.)

Filed under Teen Titans Starfire Adam Warren

293 notes

Above are the work stages on the variant cover I drew for the upcoming first issue of Wayward, the cool new Image series by Jim Zubkavich and Steve Cummings, which hits the shelves in August.

More info from Zub on Wayward (including the all-important pre-ordering info) can be found here: http://jimzub.tumblr.com/post/88978616985/pre-order-time-for-wayward-1

Anyhoo, the work stages are:

1) Initial rough, with the idea of using the kanji for Tokyo subway stations as a backdrop. (As opposed to drawing the actual map, which wasn’t gonna happen.)

2) Modified rough, with a pose that brought the character closer to the camera.

3) Inks, ahoy, done with a Japanese Seburo quill and a Rapidograph tech pen.

4) Color guide.

5) Colors, by John (Invincible) Rauch. Worked out great, IMHO.

6) Guide for some minor tweaks to the facial coloring; I’m hypersensitive about nose shading patterns on the faces I draw, alas.

7) The completed cover, with the subway-station kanji added in by Steve.

360 notes

At top, a 2011 sketch I drew based on excellent Empowered cosplay (next two images) by ace cosplayer “Riddle”: https://www.facebook.com/Riddlesmessywardrobe

Note that Rikki’s Emp suit inspired an in-universe riff in Empowered vol.5, wherein we learn that Emp has a part-time job effectively cosplaying as herself for a Superhomeys tribute show. Turns out that Emp’s fake version of her own “supersuit” comes with high heels, somewhat to her chagrin, in a reference directly ported over from the Riddle cosplay…

Filed under cosplay Empowered spandex is a remarkably difficult fabric to draw Adam Warren

580 notes

electricalice:

image

Ok this is one of the things that will get better with exercise. I’m not even that good at it myself if I have to be honest. Let’s see if I have a couple of tricks that could help you anyway in the beginning.

—> tutorial under the cut

Read More

For the record, I use the second technique demonstrated here—drawing the characters first, then deriving the horizon line and perspective from their figures—AAAAAAAALLLLLL the damn time, for good or ill.

94 notes


(Below: A compilation of recent tweets about comics technique. Above: A page I penciled for the 2004 Marvel miniseries Livewires, as an example of the technique being discussed. Inks by Jason Martin, by the way.)


Been thinking lately that many “splash pages”—as in, a comic page consisting of a single, bold image—might be better served with an additional panel.
I’m picturing a 1/5-page panoramic panel at the bottom of the page—often with characters reacting to the main (4/5-page) splash image.
Popping in an additional panel increases storytelling possibilities while retaining most of the impact of a conventional splash page, IMHO.  
Face it, comic artists: Whatever badassery you can pull off with a full-page panel, you can also pull off with a panel taking up 4/5 of a page.     
Above is a relevant example from Livewires, arguably somewhat flawed because the additional panel (at page bottom) is a full 1/4 page, rather than the 1/5 page I mentioned.
Consider the shrinking pagecount of mainstream comics: With only 20 pages per issue, you gotta make every damn page pull its narrative load.
(Let’s temporarily ignore the related topic of digital-hostile double-page spreads, which REALLY need to be rethought in the 20-page-comic era.)
Artists all too often leave dead space in even a powerful single-panel splash; why not put that wasted space to work for narrative purposes?
Writers often overestimate how much impact and power an artist can actually deliver for a Big, Important Splash Page.  
I’ve seen many Bold Splash Pages that fell a bit short and thought, “Uh, could’ve fit another panel on this page without losing any impact.”  
In the script, this striking image/ shocking reveal/ vital line of dialogue surely deserved a page to itself; on the final page, not really.
I end up thinking, “Dang it, comics writer, err on the side of more narrative content, instead of telling your artist to GO CRAZY WITH IT.”

(Below: A compilation of recent tweets about comics technique. Above: A page I penciled for the 2004 Marvel miniseries Livewires, as an example of the technique being discussed. Inks by Jason Martin, by the way.)

Been thinking lately that many “splash pages”—as in, a comic page consisting of a single, bold image—might be better served with an additional panel.

I’m picturing a 1/5-page panoramic panel at the bottom of the page—often with characters reacting to the main (4/5-page) splash image.

Popping in an additional panel increases storytelling possibilities while retaining most of the impact of a conventional splash page, IMHO. 

Face it, comic artists: Whatever badassery you can pull off with a full-page panel, you can also pull off with a panel taking up 4/5 of a page.    

Above is a relevant example from Livewires, arguably somewhat flawed because the additional panel (at page bottom) is a full 1/4 page, rather than the 1/5 page I mentioned.

Consider the shrinking pagecount of mainstream comics: With only 20 pages per issue, you gotta make every damn page pull its narrative load.

(Let’s temporarily ignore the related topic of digital-hostile double-page spreads, which REALLY need to be rethought in the 20-page-comic era.)

Artists all too often leave dead space in even a powerful single-panel splash; why not put that wasted space to work for narrative purposes?

Writers often overestimate how much impact and power an artist can actually deliver for a Big, Important Splash Page.  

I’ve seen many Bold Splash Pages that fell a bit short and thought, “Uh, could’ve fit another panel on this page without losing any impact.” 

In the script, this striking image/ shocking reveal/ vital line of dialogue surely deserved a page to itself; on the final page, not really.

I end up thinking, “Dang it, comics writer, err on the side of more narrative content, instead of telling your artist to GO CRAZY WITH IT.”